THE MIX in 2017 | Challenges and WHY NOW? | LOOKING BACK AT 2016

cropped-typewriter.jpgBy Trace Hentz (Mix co-editor)

Happy 3rd Anniversary to THE MIX!

We’re back for our third year of bringing you stories about living our mixed ancestry and the stories and history that relate to this WIDE subject/topic.

We’ve published many first-person narratives and want to see many many more on this e-mag/blog.

mixed bannerI want to share an OP-ED I wrote for LAST REAL INDIANS in early December.  It’s all about His-Story and how that relates to systemic racism in America, in the IVY LEAGUE schools with their historians.  There are good historians, definitely, but for too long, they  (Euro-white) colonized and dominated the narrative with one-sided victories.  That has to change.  That must change.  It’s the biggest challenge we face.  Let’s all begin to de-colonize His-STORY.  Divisions hurt us all.

“The great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.” ― James Baldwin, The Price of the Ticket: Collected Nonfiction, 1948-1985

conf-banner-1-1History Snobs ask WHY NOW?  READ HERE

We are always at a new crossroad, it seems.  2o17 will be no different.

Ancestry is not race.  Race is an invention. Race is the child of racism. Racism exists, while race does not.

IMPORTANT READ:  Collective Statement by U.S. History Scholars on Civil Rights and Liberties in Dangerous Times Petition | The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

WE ARE ALL RELATED – for real!

If you wish to write something for the MIX, please email me: laratrace@outlook.com

featherTrace L Hentz is co-editor of the MIX and the author of One Small Sacrifice: A Memoir and other non-fiction books on the topic of The Indian Adoption Projects, adoption history and American Indian adoptees.  She is a mix of American Indian: Shawnee-Cherokee and French Canadian/Irish.   Her husband Herb is a mix of African-American and American Indian, born and raised in Harlem.  Her BLOG

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LOOKING BACK AT 2016:

The year we played ourselves. “Now is the time to resist the slightest extension in the boundaries of what is right and just.”  The black person’s burden of managing white emotions.  Hannah Arendt and making sense of overt racism.**  Not everything is “fake news“—the problem is also waning trust in real reporting.  How to self-check the news.  Step one: Be skeptical while on Facebook and Google.  Remembering the trans women killed in the Oakland fire.   Civil servants might be our last line of defense.  The Trump kids’ ongoing inheritance.  A photojournalist on covering Duterte’s killing spree in the Philippines (with a warning: Really graphic photos are included).  “I was born white but I try to choose to be Jewish.”  Central Park was once a thriving free black community.  What race has to do with redistrictingMemes don’t matter. Two days later, the Times published an article in its Arts & Culture section titled “Memes, Myself, and I: The Internet Lets Us All Run the Campaign.

**And then, Trump appeared on our television screens as a Republican Party presidential candidate.  Before he arrived, the word “racism” most often appeared in mainstream discourse with institutional preceding it.  Racism understood as consciously held and expressed racist beliefs and sentiments, many scholars suggested, was largely a thing of the past.  The story went that, today, the majority of whites are really committed to racial equality.  Racial injustice (not racism, mind you) persists because inadvertent mind bugs, that is, implicit biases and unconsciously held beliefs, impact their actions without their consent.  Racial injustice in the contemporary moment was just our racist past haunting us.

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